Channel: Fareed Zakaria

Sort: Date | Title | Views | Sort Ascending
View:

5 the right way to destroy an financial system

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

For more What in the World watch Sundays at 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. ET on CNN Some startling images caught our eye this week. A shopping free-for-all at a major electronics chain, the equivalent of America's Best Buy. People making off with flat-screen TVs…refrigerators…and more…all at bargain basement prices. No, it’s not the holidays yet. This is what happened when the government of Venezuela decided to play Robin Hood: the army took over the privately owned chain and slashed prices. The incident got us thinking. We often talk about best practices for economies. Perhaps there should also be a list of things to avoid – a checklist titled ‘How to ruin your economy.’ Well, it so happens this isn't just a theoretical list, because Venezuela is actually ticking each of those boxes in practice.

And the perfect metropolis on this planet for meals is…?

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Fareed speaks with Anthony Bourdain, renowned chef, food critic and host of Parts Unknown, for his take on the world's greatest city to dine out in. Watch the Tokyo edition of Parts Unknown this Sunday at 9 p.m. ET/PT on CNN. You go to Tokyo, you have been many times. I think most will be surprised to know that the city that gets the most Michelin three stars is not Paris, is not New York, but Tokyo. Do you agree with that? Yes. Tokyo is the great... If I would ask ten great chefs that I know around the world what city in the world would you like – if you had to be stuck in one city and eat every meal there for the rest of your life, where would that be – nine out of ten would say Tokyo. There’s a level of perfectionism, attention to detail, quality ingredients and tradition and technique that's really unlike any place else. It's endlessly deep subject and with the show that I did there most recently, we tried to draw a direct line between that excellence and attention to detail – that fetishism, really, for food and quality with the sort of subterranean repressed ids of the Japanese male. So it's probably going to be a parental advisory type show. Uh-oh.

Britney Spears vs Somali pirates?

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

For more Last Look, watch GPS, Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN The U.N. has released a report suggesting that piracy off the coast of Somalia has dropped to the lowest level in seven years. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon credited the decline to improving international policing and prosecution as well as better security and information sharing. One Scottish merchant Navy officer reported last week that there might be additional reasons for the drop – Britney Spears. The officer told a U.K. paper that blasting songs like Britney Spears' "Hit Me Baby One More Time" and "Oops, I Did It Again," is effective in deterring approaching pirates. This isn't altogether surprising. Loud noises have successfully fended off pirates in the past and repetitive music has been used as an interrogation tactic for years. One operative at Guantanamo reported that among others, "I Love You" by that cuddly purple dinosaur named Barney was used in interrogations at the Naval base there. A prisoner detained in Kabul told Human Rights Watch that Eminem's "The Real Slim Shady" played for 20 days on end. And in 1989, the U.S. Army played music to smoke out Manuel Noriega from the Vatican embassy in Panama City, while in the 1990s, the FBI used Nancy Sinatra's "These Boots Are Made for Walking" to try and force cult leader David Koresh out of the Waco compound.

Can China reform in time?

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

I know, it's seems odd to speak of problems and the need for reform in the world's fastest growing big economy. But China has built up imbalances in that economy for some years now and they are not sustainable for much longer. Even before the financial crisis, China's top officials were aware that the economy was, in Premier Wen Jiabao's own words, "unstable, unbalanced, uncoordinated, and unsustainable." It needed to wean itself off cheap credit and undergo market reforms. Since then, in response to the global economic slowdown, China pumped even more easy money into its economy. The result, according to Morgan Stanley's Ruchir Sharma, is that China's total public and private debt is more than 200 percent of GDP, an unprecedented level for any developing country. Sharma points out that while it used to take one dollar of debt to produce one dollar of Chinese GDP growth, today it takes $4 to produce that same dollar of growth. Businesses and local governments have piled on debt. The property boom has accelerated. Without serious policy changes relatively soon, this is a bubble that is going to burst. I'm not ready to bet against China. Its leadership has shown itself to be capable of difficult decisions and smart execution. And if the leaders do manage this transition well, China will emerge stronger, and of course become the largest economy in the world. If they don't, they will likely face a slump and perhaps political tensions that bubble up in the wake of a slowing economy. For more on this, watch the video or read the TIME column

Gladwell: Why now we have received David and Goliath fallacious

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Fareed speaks with Malcolm Gladwell, longtime ‘New Yorker’ staff writer and best-selling author of ‘The Tipping Point’ and ‘Outliers’ about why we have it wrong about one of the bible’s most famous stories. Watch the full interview this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN. David and Goliath. Of course, one of the most famous stories in the world. But you retell it. Explain why you thought it was important to retell. What is the real story of David and Goliath? Well, I think we have exaggerated the extent to which David is an underdog in that situation. And I think that feeds into a very dangerous line of thinking, which suggests the only way that the weak can ever triumph is by some improbable miracle. In fact, and this an insanely fun thing to do when I was doing my book, if you talk to endocrinologists, the rabbis, Israeli Defense Force people – I mean anyone who's thought about the David and Goliath story – they will tell you, first of all, that the sling that David has in his hand is not a child's toy. It’s one of the most devastating weapons in ancient warfare. David had superior technology. I mean, once he decided to break the rules, he's the guy in charge. And then there's Goliath. There's all of these hints in the biblical story in Samuel that Goliath is not what he appears to be.

Hayden: If the president says he did not comprehend, he failed to comprehend

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Fareed speaks with former CIA and NSA chief Michael Hayden about the controversy over alleged U.S. spying on allied leaders. Watch the full interview today at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN. What about the issue of whether or not the White House knew, whether or not the president knew? Dianne Feinstein claims that she didn't know. What troubles many of us is not the actual activities here... Yes. But the idea that they are happening in some kind of strange gray zone where it's not entirely clear who is authorizing this stuff and whether it’s being overseen in an appropriate manner for a constitutional democracy. Yes. Here's how I would look at it.  If the president says he didn't know, he didn't know. I just take that at face value. If, however, Fareed, we get sentences like the White House didn't know or the administration didn't know or the National Security Council didn't know, boy, I've really got problems accepting that. What is it they thought we were going to do with those intelligence requirements? And where did they think this stuff was coming from when we answered those requirements?

Historian: Nothing makes me assume LBJ tied to JFK’s dying

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Fareed speaks with Robert Caro, Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer, historian and author of Dallas, November 22, 1963, about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.  So you know there are people who look at where Johnson was, dead in the water.  A Life magazine article was about to come out. You describe, you know, which was an investigative story, that would have further undermined him. People look at all that and say, boy, this assassination not only made Johnson president, but saved him from what might have been a complete collapse.  I mean, is it possible that had the assassination not happened, Johnson would have been so humiliated, he would have had to resign? Well, to answer that part of your question, Johnson himself felt that whether he had a second term or not, he was finished.  That's the word he used, "I'm finished." And you know how we know that he really felt that way? He told several of his key aides, who, if he had further ambitions, he would have wanted to keep with him.  He said, "I'm done." One of them was asking him, can I go to work for somebody else? He says go with him, I'm finished. So you say that Johnson really felt that his career might be over. On the other hand, nothing that I ever found...I've been doing research on Lyndon Johnson for a lot of years.  And I have to say that nothing that I found in writing or any interviews, led me to believe that whatever the story of the assassination really is, that Lyndon Johnson had anything to do with it. I never found anything that led me to believe that.

How to not resolve inequality

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

For more What in the World watch Sundays at 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. ET on CNN If there's one country in the world that looks like a utopia, its name must be Switzerland. This is a country that has it all. The average income is $82,000 a year – 65 percent more than the average American income. Everyone has great healthcare, childcare, and education. The unemployment rate is 3 percent. There is almost no corruption. According to the OECD, of 34 developed countries surveyed, the Swiss have the greatest degree of trust in their government. And, of course, it is a spectacular country with great traditions of skiing, cheese, chocolate, and wine. What could possibly go wrong? Well, quite a lot, actually. The Swiss are furious about income inequality. The story is a familiar one. According to Reuters, in 1984 top earners in Swiss firms made 6 times as much as the bottom earners. Today, they make 43-times what bottom earners make. At some banks and firms, CEOs make 200-times the salary of the lowest-paid employee.

India learns a lesson

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

For more Last Look, watch GPS, Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN In 1999, 10,000 people were killed when a ferocious cyclone hit eastern India. A week ago, the same region, the state of Odisha, formerly known as Orissa, was once again in the crosshairs. This time it was the region's most powerful storm this century. But there was a much better outcome. A million Odishans were evacuated to shelters ahead of time. Only 21 people seem to have lost their lives. Thousands of others were saved. Extreme climate events may be getting worse, but technology has truly enabled us to save lives. We're now better than ever predicting the scale of storms and cyclones and we're better than ever at getting the message out. Of course you still need a government that manages these situations well, and for that all credit to the government of Odisha, which has learned from the mistakes of 1999.

James Baker on the debt ceiling

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Former U.S. Treasury Secretary James Baker offers his take on the recent debt ceiling negotiations. Watch the full interview on "Fareed Zakaria GPS," this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET. Well, if I'm wearing my Treasury secretary's hat, which I wore for four years, I would love to see us do away with the requirement for increasing the debt ceiling. But as a taxpayer and as someone who thinks that the greatest threat facing the United States today is this huge ticking debt bomb out there, that has been created by our continuing to spend and borrow without restraint, then I think it's something we pretty much need to keep. I know you're aware, and your viewers are probably aware of the fact, that when he was a senator from Illinois, President Obama, Senator Obama, voted against increasing the debt ceiling. He wasn't willing to increase it. He was ready to see us go into default. So this is a political exercise that occurs any time there’s a necessity of raising the debt ceiling.

Norway’s shocking TV hit

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

For more Last Look, watch GPS, Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN In Norway, where the divorce rate is 40 percent, one official has some advice for married couples: Do as Tina Fey and Steve Carell did in the movie "Date Night." Go out. That date ended with car chases and mobster confrontations. But at least they weren't home on the couch. Last Friday, 1.3 million Norwegians were indeed home, watching a smash hit television show. That's a quarter of the nation's population, tuning in for over 12 uninterrupted hours for a national…knitting evening. Yes. Knitting. So-called slow TV is huge here. Whether it's seven hour train rides, a full day of salmon fishing, 12 hours of burning wood or 30-hour interviews. More than 50 percent of the population once tuned in for a ship's 134-hour coastline cruise. The knitting evening did have a dramatic twist. After hours of knitting, they attempted to break the world time record for producing a sweater. Starting from the very beginning – the shearing of a sheep. They unfortunately missed the record books, but eight and a half hours later – voila, a sweater! One company plans to bring slow TV to the United States. Perhaps it will be a hit. Compared with 21 hours of Senator Ted Cruz reading Green Eggs and Ham, discussions about wool seem absolutely spellbinding.

On GPS Sunday: Assessing the U.S. economic system and 2nd time period presidencies

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN On GPS this Sunday: A panel of leading historians offer their take on the state of the U.S. economy, second term presidencies and more. “I think there are no historical analogies more perilous than comparing a Munich or a Nixon in China, from which we have generations of perspective, to a deal that is days old,” says Nancy Gibbs, managing editor of TIME. “You know, this could prove to be a turning point, as obviously the president would like to argue that it's a long overdue reset of a relationship. But it all could also fall apart.” Then, a referendum to cap CEO pay to 12-times the salary of a firm's lowest-paid employee: What in the world is going on in Switzerland? And, why kids in South Korea and Finland are getting a better education than their counterparts in the United States. And the Last Look: the commercial that has millions of Indians and Pakistanis misty-eyed.

Page 1 of 3123