Channel: Fareed Zakaria

Sort: Date | Title | Views | Sort Descending
View:

Why Iranians got their jeans in a twist

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

For more Last Look, watch GPS, Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN It’s no surprise that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu offended some Iranians with what he said at the United Nations recently, describing the country’s new president as a wolf in sheep’s clothing. But that comment actually wasn’t what sparked an anti- Netanyahu Twitter campaign in Iran, although it was a clothing related faux pas. Netanyahu said: “I think if the Iranian people have their way they would be wearing blue jeans, they would have western music, they'd have free elections.” Perhaps Mossad missed this one. But we could have helped him out here. You see, Iranians do wear jeans. They've done so for years. We saw a lot of people in denim when we were in Tehran two years ago. As we said at the time, Tehran is a bustling cosmopolitan city, and its people are very fashionable. But Iranians found his comment condescending. They took to Facebook and Twitter and the message was clear. Zip it, Netanyahu, we wear jeans. They posted pictures of Iranians doing just that. Praying in jeans. The ayatollah reading to a child in jeans, and photos like the one in the video, mocking Bibi’s famous red line speech.

Regulation of the jungle now not excellent sufficient

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

By Fareed Zakaria The revelations about the U.S. National Security Agency and its spying on foreign – even allied leaders – has been embarrassing for the Obama administration at a time when it hardly needs more bad news. Last week, European leaders reacted angrily to claims that the United States had been eavesdropping on calls, including listening in on German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s cell phone. The revelations prompted Merkel to warn relations with the U.S. had been severely shaken. But is all this more than just an embarrassment? And should it raise alarms abroad and at home? At first glance, this is a story that is less about ethics and more about power – the great power gap between the United States and other countries, even rich European ones. The most illuminating response to the revelations came from Bernard Kouchner, formerly the foreign minister of France. He said in a radio interview: "Let's be honest, we eavesdrop too. Everyone is listening to everyone else." Kouchner went on to add "we don't have the same means as the United States, which makes us jealous."

Zakaria: Authority has collapsed inside GOP

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN In trying to explain how Washington got into the mess it is in, pundits and politicians have focused on ideology. They point out that the country has become more polarized, as have political parties, in particular the Republican Party. The diagnosis is accurate but there is another, distinctive cause of the current crisis that might have even more long-lasting effects – the collapse of authority, especially within the Republican Party, which might mean that these new tactics of threats, crises, and deadlock are now the new normal. On the surface, the behavior of the Republicans today looks a lot like that in 1995 and 1996, when the party took a strongly ideologically oriented position, stood its ground, and shut down the government. But that movement was led by a speaker of the house, Newt Gingrich, who inspired, shaped, and directed it from start to finish. John Boehner, by contrast, has openly acknowledged that his understanding of leadership is to "sort of manage whatever [his] people want to do," as CBS's Bob Schieffer memorably put it. It proved easier to resolve the crisis in the 1990s because Gingrich had the power to speak for his side. Watch the video for the full Take. For more, read the Washington Post column.

Tehran no longer best Iran deal drawback

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Saudi Arabia is not going to accept any deal on Iran's nuclear program, no matter what is in it. Saudi objections to the Islamic Republic of Iran are existential. The Saudis regard Tehran as a heretical, Shiite, Persian enemy that must be opposed. Its antipathy predates Iran's nuclear program and will persist whatever the resolution of it. And then the Republicans in the U.S., some of whom have serious objections and others who see this as an easy avenue to outflank President Obama on the right, placing him in the familiar spot of a liberal Democrat who is soft on America's foes. Many of us have assumed that the greatest obstacle to a deal would come from Tehran. Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and the Revolutionary Guards remain deeply anti-American, and they may well oppose the concessions that President Rouhani and Foreign Minister Zarif would have to make to get a deal. But it’s now clear that greater obstacles might lie in the path of the negotiators on the other side. The minute any deal is announced, Saudi Arabia and Israel will denounce it, and many Republicans will join in. Given that Congress would have to pass laws to lift any of the major sanctions against Iran, this could prove to be an obstacle that cannot be overcome. So Obama faces two major challenges. First he has to get a deal that the hard-liners in Tehran can live with. Then he has to get one that the hard-liners in Washington and Jerusalem and Riyadh can abide. If he can do both, maybe he will deserve his Nobel Peace Prize after all. Watch the video for the full Take or read the TIME column

On GPS Sunday: Michael Hayden on the Europe spying controversy

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN On GPS this Sunday: The revelations over alleged tapping of German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s cell phone by the U.S. National Security Agency have strained relations between the two nations. But how serious are the current tensions? Fareed speaks with former German Defense Minister Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg. Next, the American side of the story. Who would have given the NSA permission to spy on leaders of ally countries? Former NSA and CIA chief Michael Hayden gives his take. “[O]ccasionally, what you have is political guidance kind of being placed on top of your operational planning,” Hayden says. “I had political guidance while I was director of NSA.  I had targets. I had legitimate needs. But I was told, frankly, back off. That target is too sensitive. I don't want you doing that at this time, for this purpose.” And, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg on his legacy as he prepares to step down.

Historian: Nothing makes me assume LBJ tied to JFK’s dying

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Fareed speaks with Robert Caro, Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer, historian and author of Dallas, November 22, 1963, about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.  So you know there are people who look at where Johnson was, dead in the water.  A Life magazine article was about to come out. You describe, you know, which was an investigative story, that would have further undermined him. People look at all that and say, boy, this assassination not only made Johnson president, but saved him from what might have been a complete collapse.  I mean, is it possible that had the assassination not happened, Johnson would have been so humiliated, he would have had to resign? Well, to answer that part of your question, Johnson himself felt that whether he had a second term or not, he was finished.  That's the word he used, "I'm finished." And you know how we know that he really felt that way? He told several of his key aides, who, if he had further ambitions, he would have wanted to keep with him.  He said, "I'm done." One of them was asking him, can I go to work for somebody else? He says go with him, I'm finished. So you say that Johnson really felt that his career might be over. On the other hand, nothing that I ever found...I've been doing research on Lyndon Johnson for a lot of years.  And I have to say that nothing that I found in writing or any interviews, led me to believe that whatever the story of the assassination really is, that Lyndon Johnson had anything to do with it. I never found anything that led me to believe that.

Why JFK’s assassination nonetheless looms massive

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Fareed speaks with Robert Caro, Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer, historian and author of Dallas, November 22, 1963, about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Watch the full interview Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN. What do you think explains both the conspiracy theories around John F. Kennedy’s death and the sense of why has this assassination loom so large in American imagination? Well, you know, it’s almost like myth, Homeric myth – young, handsome, the athlete, dying young, at the height of his glory, you know? A beautiful man, really charming, handsome, idealistic. Murder, blood, violence, horror. And in this – in an instant, there – this man is lying across his wife's lap, basically, in the back seat of a car with his head blown apart, blood all over her. For that reason alone, it has all the qualities of a mythic drama in the highest terms. Then you also say, there is the whole thing that happened that you may be too young to remember. The four days of television – all the networks, there’s only one broadcast. So there's a pool broadcast. The Nielsen ratings showed that for those four days, the television set in the average American home was on for 31.6 hours. That’s eight hours a day that virtually America is watching the same words said by the same people. And you say, I wrote in my book, you know, the funeral procession, we think of the triumphs of Rome, the triumphal processions of Rome.

And the perfect metropolis on this planet for meals is…?

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Fareed speaks with Anthony Bourdain, renowned chef, food critic and host of Parts Unknown, for his take on the world's greatest city to dine out in. Watch the Tokyo edition of Parts Unknown this Sunday at 9 p.m. ET/PT on CNN. You go to Tokyo, you have been many times. I think most will be surprised to know that the city that gets the most Michelin three stars is not Paris, is not New York, but Tokyo. Do you agree with that? Yes. Tokyo is the great... If I would ask ten great chefs that I know around the world what city in the world would you like – if you had to be stuck in one city and eat every meal there for the rest of your life, where would that be – nine out of ten would say Tokyo. There’s a level of perfectionism, attention to detail, quality ingredients and tradition and technique that's really unlike any place else. It's endlessly deep subject and with the show that I did there most recently, we tried to draw a direct line between that excellence and attention to detail – that fetishism, really, for food and quality with the sort of subterranean repressed ids of the Japanese male. So it's probably going to be a parental advisory type show. Uh-oh.

On GPS Sunday: Assessing the U.S. economic system and 2nd time period presidencies

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN On GPS this Sunday: A panel of leading historians offer their take on the state of the U.S. economy, second term presidencies and more. “I think there are no historical analogies more perilous than comparing a Munich or a Nixon in China, from which we have generations of perspective, to a deal that is days old,” says Nancy Gibbs, managing editor of TIME. “You know, this could prove to be a turning point, as obviously the president would like to argue that it's a long overdue reset of a relationship. But it all could also fall apart.” Then, a referendum to cap CEO pay to 12-times the salary of a firm's lowest-paid employee: What in the world is going on in Switzerland? And, why kids in South Korea and Finland are getting a better education than their counterparts in the United States. And the Last Look: the commercial that has millions of Indians and Pakistanis misty-eyed.

On GPS Sunday: Figuring out Hurricane Haiyan, and assessing China’s future

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Watch "Fareed Zakaria GPS," Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN On GPS this Sunday: More than 10 million Filipinos have been either displaced or left homeless by Typhoon Haiyan. But why was the impact so bad, and why was the response so slow? Fareed speaks with Stephen Flynn, founding director of the Center for Resilient Studies at Northeastern University, and Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Laurie Garrett for their take on why this typhoon was so deadly. Also, China's new leaders gathered this week for the so-called Third Plenum meeting, following which China announced it is relaxing its three-decades-old one child policy and is ending “reeducation” through labor camps. So what’s behind the changes and what where is China heading? New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof and The Council on Foreign Relations’ Elizabeth Economy offer their takes. And, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, biographer, and historian Robert Caro talks about the legacy of President John F. Kennedy as the U.S. prepares to mark 50 years since his assassination. “I've been doing research on Lyndon Johnson for a lot of years,” Caro says. “And I have to say that nothing that I found in writing, or any interviews, led me to believe that whatever the story of the assassination really is, that Lyndon Johnson had anything to do with it.  I never found anything that led me to believe that.”

Gladwell: Why now we have received David and Goliath fallacious

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Fareed speaks with Malcolm Gladwell, longtime ‘New Yorker’ staff writer and best-selling author of ‘The Tipping Point’ and ‘Outliers’ about why we have it wrong about one of the bible’s most famous stories. Watch the full interview this Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. ET on CNN. David and Goliath. Of course, one of the most famous stories in the world. But you retell it. Explain why you thought it was important to retell. What is the real story of David and Goliath? Well, I think we have exaggerated the extent to which David is an underdog in that situation. And I think that feeds into a very dangerous line of thinking, which suggests the only way that the weak can ever triumph is by some improbable miracle. In fact, and this an insanely fun thing to do when I was doing my book, if you talk to endocrinologists, the rabbis, Israeli Defense Force people – I mean anyone who's thought about the David and Goliath story – they will tell you, first of all, that the sling that David has in his hand is not a child's toy. It’s one of the most devastating weapons in ancient warfare. David had superior technology. I mean, once he decided to break the rules, he's the guy in charge. And then there's Goliath. There's all of these hints in the biblical story in Samuel that Goliath is not what he appears to be.

How to not resolve inequality

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

For more What in the World watch Sundays at 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. ET on CNN If there's one country in the world that looks like a utopia, its name must be Switzerland. This is a country that has it all. The average income is $82,000 a year – 65 percent more than the average American income. Everyone has great healthcare, childcare, and education. The unemployment rate is 3 percent. There is almost no corruption. According to the OECD, of 34 developed countries surveyed, the Swiss have the greatest degree of trust in their government. And, of course, it is a spectacular country with great traditions of skiing, cheese, chocolate, and wine. What could possibly go wrong? Well, quite a lot, actually. The Swiss are furious about income inequality. The story is a familiar one. According to Reuters, in 1984 top earners in Swiss firms made 6 times as much as the bottom earners. Today, they make 43-times what bottom earners make. At some banks and firms, CEOs make 200-times the salary of the lowest-paid employee.

Page 1 of 3123