Channel: Amanpour

Sort: Date | Title | Views | Sort Descending
View:

Spokesman defends Maliki against claims of sectarianism

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

With Sunni extremists grabbing up Iraqi territory and now just 40 miles from the capital, a spokesman for Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, a Shiite, defended the leader against claims of irreversible polarization. “Prime Minister Maliki has never been a sectarian,” Zuhair al-Naher, Spokesman for the Iraqi Prime Minister's Islamic Dawa Party, told CNN’s Hala Gorani – in for Christiane Amanpour – on Tuesday. “I am not saying that Maliki is faultless. Iraq is a difficult country to run. It is difficult to include everyone perfectly and keep them happy.”

Why Iraq could be more dangerous than pre-9/11 Afghanistan

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

As Sunni extremists broaden their control of territory from Syria deep into Iraq, the Middle East may now be facing its greatest challenge in decades. “This is the Talibanization of Iraq,” journalist and author Robin Wright told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour on Monday. “And there’s no question that the global Jihadi threat is greater today than it was at the height in the 1980s or even in 2001, when we saw the attacks in Washington and New York.” The U.S. has started moving more military assets into the region as militants advance towards the Iraqi city of Baquba, just 60 kilometers from Baghdad. President Barack Obama has said that he will not send troops in on the ground. The rise of ISIS, or the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, has been fuelled by civil war in Syria. The group is trying to carve out a Sunni statelet that straddles the nearly none-existent border between Iraq and Syria. “Ultimately we can't solve Iraq with also dealing with Syria,” Wright said. “That's what makes this challenge arguably greater than any one we've faced in the Middle East, you could argue, in six or seven decades.”

Iraq warns of ‘a thousand’ bin Ladens

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

In appealing for more American help in fighting off Sunni Islamic extremists, the Iraqi Ambassador to the U.S. warned of a dire threat to the entire globe. “What you have in Afghanistan, with one bin Laden – you will have a thousand of them,” Ambassador Lukman Faily told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour on Monday. “That’s the situation in Iraq.” The Obama Administration is scrambling to stave off the unthinkable: The end of Iraq as we know it, partitioned along sectarian lines with a rump al-Qaeda-like statelet in control of vast parts of the country, as well as Syria.

Former U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Zalmay Khalilzad: ‘The reality of Iraq has changed after Mosul’

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan, the U.N. and Iraq, Zalmay Khalilzad has been a key voice in the relationship between the U.S. and the Middle East over the years. Amanpour asked what he thinks of the situation in Iraq right now as ISIS insurgents have gone from taking Mosul, Iraq's second city, to moving in around Baghdad. “The speed with which things have moved have reminded me of Afghanistan in the nineties when the Taliban were on the scene and moved extremely rapidly to take over one city after another.” The U.S. has spent a decade training the people of Iraq to fight this sort of insurgency, will they step back into the fray? “The reality of Iraq has changed after Mosul”. "The U.S. forces have to take into account not only the Iraqi forces; can they be helped? Can they be effective? But also the Kurdish forces, how to relate to them because they are perhaps in a better position”. Former Prime Minister of Iraq Ayad Allawi told the program that the U.S. would make things worse if they entered the conflict. He said he would be going to Baghdad to attempt to create unity, could he achieve it? Khalilzad stated, “He is a key figure but there are others who are important now too”. “No single person can do the job, the Iraqis have to come together”.

Former Iraqi Prime Minister Ayad Allawi: ‘The belt of Baghdad has fallen’

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

As ISIS (the Islamic State for Iraq and Syria) militants carve their way through Iraq, currently trying to take a power plant in Baiji that powers much of Baghdad, the Iraq and the U.S. governments are reeling from the fall of Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city. The first head of state following the fall of Saddam Hussein, Ayad Allawi, knows the lengths the country has gone in recent years to prevent events such as the current crisis. The military has been trained for years by the U.S., but many soldiers have laid down their weapons and fled in the face of the insurgents. “They have nothing to fight for. Absolutely”, says Allawi. “They [Sunnis] have been disenfranchised, they have been oppressed, the situation has been getting out of control gradually. The forces of extremes have been thriving in Iraq, they [militants] have frankly been killing one thousand people, on average, a month and the government was unable and is still unable to do anything about it". Amanpour asked if we are seeing the end of Iraq as we know it. "Probably", replied Allawi. "It depends how it's going to be handled. But I think we are moving to a Syrianization kind of situation". Are we moving in the direction of partition? "Very possibly", said Allawi. Is Baghdad, Iraq's capital, at risk? "The belt of Baghdad has fallen". Allawi stated. "The outskirts are under the control of the armed people, the militants, the Sunni militants… The government of Baghdad is unable to challenge this, the government is unable to prevent explosions inside Baghdad."

Angelina Jolie and William Hague: The odd couple

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Actress and U.N. Special Envoy Angelina Jolie and British Foreign Secretary told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour they didn’t mind being labelled the “odd couple” of international relations. "We're making progress!" says Hague. "Whatever works!" adds Jolie. The two have joined forces in the fight against sexual violence in conflict. The recent the four day summit in London has brought attention to the topic they are both  passionate about. "Angelina brings what governments cannot bring" says Hague. "You need a major government of the world to be involved in this. With that diplomatic network, with our development budget with our convening power to bring together something like this summit" "But you also need to reach people who are not usually interested in what governments have to say and there are people who will take notice of what she [Angelina] says"

Brazil Ambassador Roberto Jaguaribe: ‘For us, Football is more than sport’

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

With the Cup comes the controversy. At least that seems to be the case with Brazil, as the FIFA World Cup is set to kick off this week. Brazil, a country where football is not just on the pitch but in the blood, has been suffering riots and criticism from FIFA boss Sepp Blatter, who at one point claimed the preparations were the worst he's ever seen. The Brazilian Ambassador to the UK Roberto Jaguaribe told Amanpour the preparations are not that bad. "I believe they are Brazilian. Of course, it is important not to lose sight of the specificities of the country where you are going." "We are deploying 150,000 officers of the police and the armed forces to guarantee the safety of the games."

Egyptian women’s rights activist Hania Moheeb: ‘Sisi owes a lot to Egyptian Women’

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Today, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi ordered his interior minister to fight sexual harassment after several women were attacked during his inauguration celebrations. But will el-Sisi's sentiment make a difference? "Definitely", says Hania Moheeb a prominent activist for Women's rights in Egypt and who is herself a victim of sexual harassment. "President Sisi owes a lot to Egyptian women who lined up to vote for him." "I was happy that he spoke about the issue...I think that if he has the will and declared that he has the will then something will happen."

British Counter-Intelligence expert Richard Barrett: Western nations have acted ‘a bit too late’ in Syria

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

The inaction of the West has prompted Muslims from across the globe to make the treacherous journey to Syria to join the even more dangerous civil war that has been waged for almost two years. 12,000 fighters have flooded Syria, more even than went to fight the Soviets in Afghanistan, have created a violent reaction in western nations known as 'blowback'. British Counter-Intelligence expert and veteran Intelligence officer Richard Barrett told Amanpour that "In many ways, the Western nations, as Mr. Brahimi suggested, are in a bit of a bind here. What is the correct policy to conduct towards Syria? And I think the retiring ambassador, Robert Ford, also suggested this. It's now a bit too late. But with hindsight, you would have done things differently. But that's always the way. And very, very hard now for Western nations to correct a policy which would satisfy all their citizens that they were doing the right thing." Amanpour asked if there was any way the U.K., France or even the United States could prevent foreign fighters in Syria returning and encouraging domestic terrorism. "I mean, there's a big difference I think about being motivated to go as a foreign fighter and coming back as a domestic terrorist. But nonetheless, it doesn't take many. And if it's only 1 percent of 3,000 people already and counting, then that's going to be quite a problem".

Former Special Envoy to Syria Lakhdar Brahimi: I resigned in protest

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Once Special Envoy to Syria for the Arab League and the U.N., Lakhdar Brahimi left his post on May 14th of this year. He went out with a bang, telling Amanpour he resigned in protesting f the world’s refusal to act in Syria. “I resigned because I was getting nowhere and it was the only way for me to protest the total inattention of the international community and the region to the situation in Syria” It was a move that echoed the resignation of Former US Ambassador to Syria Robert Ford in February. “I was no longer in a position where I felt I could defend the American policy”, said Ford just last week.

NATO Commander: Bergdahl hasn’t been debriefed yet

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl, whose release from five years in Taliban captivity has been mired in controversy, is not “actually being debriefed yet,” NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander for Europe, General Philip Breedlove, told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour on Friday. “What we're concentrating on right now is his health. He has been in a very tough place for a long time. Landstuhl Medical Center [in Germany] is the perfect place for this. It is the best place in the world to do it. That's what we're focussed on right now." Breedlove and Amanpour spoke in Normandy, France, where world leaders marked 70 years since the Allied D-Day invasion during World War II. Bergdahl’s release has become a political football in the United States since it was announced last week. Critics believe he was a deserter (an Army investigation found that he walked off his Afghan base voluntarily) and say he was not worth the five Taliban members who were released from Guantanamo Bay in exchange for his freedom. “The Army has given all of our forces a great culture, and that culture is no soldier left behind,” General Breedlove said. “So no soldier, no sailor, airman, nor marine we leave behind.”

D-Day, when war came home in pictures

Added by 4 years ago

0 Views0 Comments

Christiane Amanpour reports from Normandy on Hollywood's effort to capture D-Day as it happened. Click above to watch.

Page 10 of 37« First...89101112...2030...Last »